drama

Haunting Horror: The Strain By Guillermo del Toro y Chuck Hogan

https://i1.wp.com/d.gr-assets.com/books/1326225354l/6065215.jpgWhen I heard about the book series, I wanted to read just to get a better idea of del Toro’s storytelling and writing style beyond the screen. I’ve been a fan since Pan’s Labyrinth (though technically Hellboy, director wise) and even saw the film in theaters. Afterwards, I made an effort to see more of his original works, but so far that’s resulted in only watching The Devil’s Backbone (for shame LA). I plan to redeem myself, somewhat, by catching his Gothic Romance, Crimson Peak in theaters soon. Apparently the genre is something that’s been reiterated by not only del Toro, but the actors as well. I imagine this is because many assume it’s another horror/ghosts flick. I am not familiar with the genre much myself, but am definitely looking forward to the story and all the wonderful imagery I’ve come to expect from del Toro’s films.

That said, Keep Reading

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Currently Reading: Lorraine Hansberry (A Raisin in the Sun)

A Raisin in the Sun by Lorraine Hansberry

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© Image courtesy of L.A. Lanier’s Instagram (@thesquibbler)

As part of the Advanced Placement English curriculum during my junior year (11th grade) of high school, we had the option of reading one of two plays. This and The Glass Menagerie by Tennessee Williams. I read the latter with no problem. I purchased both works, but never got around to reading A Raisin in the Sun. Unfortunately, I think some of the reason I didn’t select Hansberry was because there was this sense of you should learn more about your heritage. But when it came to the students it seemed as if ones blackness was called into question if you weren’t reading all of these prominent black female writers when given the option (Toni Morrison, naturally another). I certainly appreciated the fact that a southern suburban high school, gave us the option, and didn’t insist on only reading white American male authors. However, all the other females in my class of black heritage were reading it, and this notion of we’re going to determine who you are was a huge turn off. So, I resisted. Plus the synopsis for Menagerie appealed more to me. What amused me later, was when we watched film adaptations, these students were some of the first who seemed disinterested in either play. Further encouraging me to remove myself from this display of false pride flag waving. Years later, it’s still in my unread pile…until now. After reading one play I was in the mood for another and thought what better time to rectify this wrong that was no fault of Hansberry’s, but self-exploring adolescent circumstances.

If interested in a written review or just to hear my opinions on the work let me know in the comments or contact me 🙂

Currently Reading: Wole Soyinka (Death and The King’s Horseman)

Death And The King’s Horseman: A Play by Wole Soyinka.

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© Image courtesy of L.A. Lanier’s Instagram (@thesquibbler)

I acquired this book on a complimentary whim without any prior knowledge of the author. The cover design, name, and, admittedly, length helped. In the past, I’ve had the habit of trying to stick to recommended lists or authors I remembered from classes. As I matured I realized how limiting that can be, especially for someone who writes, when the majority of those included were renowned North American or English authors, and likely classics. Each time I had the opportunity to read beyond “my” culture, I found a great joy in it, and it’s something I continue and encourage. I also get a kick out of taking a chance and discovering new authors. I’ve made dozens of selections this way prior to my palm sized technology. Now when hitting up book stores, I utilize my cell phone to get a general idea of new authors, if there’s too much doubt, but it’s still just as exciting. Anywho, I don’t expect that by reading more diversely I’ll become some expert of experiences those in other countries face, their histories, or even truly understand what life is/was like, but it does make me feel more globally connected because it provides a wider scope of what it means to be human and not just [insert nationality].

If you’d like a written review or my opinion on this work, feel free to let me know in the comments or contact me. 🙂